elote con queso y mayonesa

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I’m no stranger to street food. I’ve been eating off the streets long before these decked out food trucks became the thing. This is one of the many perks of growing up in the Bay Area. East Oakland taco trucks. Churro carts that pump out spirals of dough into bubbling hot oil (and put those Disneyland churros to shame). Tamales straight from the hands of the Tamale Lady. Ziplock baggies filled with mango and jicama and watermelon and doused in lime juice and chili. And those damn late night bacon-wrapped hotdogs. These are all things dear to my heart.

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Elote is at the top of my list of all time favorite street foods. Hot, sweet corn on the cob slathered in mayo and coated with queso and a squirt of lime and a sprinkle of chili powder. It sounds insane and it is. Insanely delish. Some people can’t seem to wrap their heads around the mayonaise on corn concept, but you need to trust. It’s kind of life changing.

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One of my favorite Sunday morning activities is hitting up the flea market, grabbing a papusa for breakfast, followed by roasted elote with the works. There’s something terribly satisfying about grubbing on corn while perusing the aisles of flea market treasures. But that’s probably because eating and shopping are two of my most beloved pastimes. And it’s also multi-tasking.

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Brentwood corn is the best of the best. And I’ve been picking up a few ears from the farmers market every weekend since June. Though it is fantastic au naturel, it’s way too tempting to have corn on the cob at home and not eat it street style. So that’s what’s been happening over here. Street corn is in the house.

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elote con queso y mayonesa 

serves 4

4 ears of corn 

kosher salt

2 limes, cut into wedges 

1/2 cup mayonaise

1 cup crumbled cotija (mexican cheese) or grated parmesan

ancho or new mexico chili powder 

to roast the corn: 

Heat your grill to medium.

Pull the outer husks of the corn down to the base and remove the silk from each ear. Fold husks back into place, and place the corn in a large bowl of cold water with 1 tablespoon of salt for 10 minutes.

Remove corn from water and shake off excess. Place the corn on the grill, close the cover and grill for 15 to 20 minutes, turning every 5 minutes, or until kernels are tender when pierced with a paring knife. Remove the husks.

**Alternatively, boiled corn works just as well. Remove husks and silk from corn. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add the corn. When the pot comes back to a boil, turn off heat, and cover the pot. Remove corn from the pot after five minutes.

Squeeze lime juice over the surface of the corn. Using a pastry brush or spatula, brush each ear of corn with a generous coat of mayo. Place crumbled cotija on a plate and roll each corn in cheese.  Sprinkle with chili powder and extra lime juice if desired.

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